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by Jig along

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Bottle Brush flowers

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14th Sep 2006, 09:02   | tags:,,

Desiree says:

That is really cool. It looks alot like the Fairy Dusters we have here in the southwest US.

14th Sep 2006, 09:19

Jigalong says:

They do look alike, but theyre from different families :-(

14th Sep 2006, 09:27

Viv says:

they do sell them here now - but they don't grow to their full glory!

14th Sep 2006, 11:00

Dhamaka says:

beautiful. I love the wasps rear end in the top one

I have one I grew from a cutting and it even flowers twice but as it's in a pot it has no chance of attaining tree-like proportions like the ones I saw in Buenos Aires.

the smell of the leaves when crushed is lovely too

14th Sep 2006, 14:25

ElphsHouse says:

how gorgeous! I have a weeping bottle brush tree in my backyard here in Florida. I've never managed to take such fabulous pictures of it though! Well done!

14th Sep 2006, 14:40

Dhamaka says:

nothing like as beautiful but..
here and here

14th Sep 2006, 15:48

Jigalong says:

Thanks for the compliments all.

I'm flabbergasketed that a bottle brush can survive the cold in the UK (doesnt it snow over there), the weather in Florida would be right up its alley.

I believe Viv that the bottle brushes was one of the first plants taken back to the UK some 200 yrs ago. The insect that I have taken a shot of, is definitely a bee.

I'm also very impressed by the way you have managed to get your bottle brush to flower so young Dhamaka.

14th Sep 2006, 16:11

Dhamaka says:

My roof is windy, Jigalong, but it's south facing and a real sun trap (I fried an egg on it earlier this year). I grow all sorts of plants on it that shouldn't grow in the UK and bring the fragile plants into the kitchen if I think it's going to be really cold.

I didn't know that they had to be an age to flower - do they?

14th Sep 2006, 18:17

Jigalong says:

That is a very good question, and I'm not 100% sure that what I'm about to say is correct, but I will say it anyway. Bottle brushes are perennials and usually quite fast growing. Generally they need to be 2-3 yr before they start flowering, however, I'm not sure whether cuttings of bottle brushes will shorten this period to under year olds.

15th Sep 2006, 04:46

Dhamaka says:

I think it was 6 - 9 months old when it first flowered. The funny thing is, I've tried to propogate cuttings of it for other people and not one of them has taken since!

15th Sep 2006, 06:59

Jigalong says:

Now this is getting interesting. I will need to get further information from people who know more about these plants than I do.

If you know about propagating I'm sure I'm not telling you anything thats new, but you should be using rooting hormones for semi hardwood, striking should be 7 to 10 cm long taken at the growing tips, strip leaves off so there is only 4 to 6 (the leaves are very small), make sure all flowers, if any are removed, propagate towards the end of Summer, which should be about now in England, and place in a warm humid environment.

15th Sep 2006, 07:11

Dhamaka says:

I used the rooting hormones and got the striking more or less right (more by luck than judgement) but didn't do the rest. I usually just plonk the strikings into some earth and leave them.

I will follow your advice for a Medlar tree I'm about to try and propogate though

15th Sep 2006, 07:37

swamprose says:

think it also has to do with which part of the plant was nipped off. If you take off a bit that is due to bloom in a year, then it will do it. If you take off something further down, or from a younger plant, think it takes longer...but hey, I know nothing about bottlebrush. Asexual plant propagation, that's what you're up to...and easy with the hormones. Too much and it stops the rooting. going to bed..; )

15th Sep 2006, 08:23

jesson says:

Try honey as a natural rooting hormone.

24th Sep 2006, 08:17

anonymous says:

DXZCAFX

14th Apr 2007, 20:05

NIKKI(nikkijbrown-at-hotmail-dot-co-dot-uk) says:

I have a bottle brush plant that is now about 6 foot tall and I have yet to take a cutting that has survived. I shall try your method and see if it works. Is there any way that I can send you a photo of my bottle brush? It is an unusual sight in Southampton uk.

14th Apr 2007, 20:12

Jigalong says:

Hi nikki, you can set up a moblog site and paste a picture there, or send me an email with the picture as an attachment. Let me know how you cuttings go. I have had another person who had sent me an email about propagation in the last week. Here is what I recommended

I believe that the best success will be achieved when you take tip pruning of the bottlebrush. That is using the end 10 cm. Make sure you remove all flowers from the cuttings as well as all leaves, except 3 or 4. Use of rooting hormone/gel would be advised (semi hard wood strength). The medium that you place the cuttings into should be well drained, as fungal diseases can be an issue. Also to increase the humidity, you might try cutting a plastic bottle in half and place over the cutting, or alternatives making a frame of sort, maybe from fencing wire/coat hanger, and put plastic over the top.

Please tell me how this has worked for you.

19th Apr 2007, 02:45

joyce(joyce-dot-hewson-at-blueyonder-dot-co-dot-uk) says:

Hi can anyone tell me if you are supposed to cut back a bottle brush plant please, i have had one for about 7 or 8 yrs now i have never cut it back but it is overhanging my pool but do'nt want to damage it doing something i should'nt as it is beautifull when it is in bloom.

8th Jun 2008, 14:52

Jig along says:

Bottle Brush plants are pretty hardy plants and should be able to be pruned without too many problems. Like most pruning techniqes, cut just above the node or near the trunk, cut at 90 degree to minimise the cutting area, and also prune so that the plant isn't too lop sided.

8th Jun 2008, 23:11

Kevin says:

I have a bottle brush plant but since planting 14 months ago it seems to be receeding. It didnt like the winter and I wonder if the heavy clay soil is what is causing the problems.Almost waterlogged through winter

10th Jul 2008, 20:32

Jig along says:

Hi Kevin, In Australia, bottle brushes thrive on neglect, so dont water it and dont fertilise it. Phosphorus kills Australian natives.

It definites sounds like having it waterlogged would be a problem. Other gardeners from England could be able to give advice, but using gypsum as a soil conditioner to break up the clay wouldnt hurt.

12th Jul 2008, 14:41

Nick says:

Wow - what a super find. 3 cheers for Jig along. I have just bought a place in North Wales and there's one of these trees in the front garden. It is probably about 7 years old but has been neglected. It has plenty of growth on one side, less on another and is hence "lop sided". I am tempted to cut it back quite radically and hope it gets a new start. Any thoughts Jiggers?

16th Sep 2008, 17:36

Jig along says:

As a general rule, pruning to shape should be ok. Good luck!

18th Sep 2008, 10:38

Nick says:

Thanks dude.

19th Sep 2008, 10:02

Jig along says:

No worries mate, tell us how the bottle brush is doing in 12 months:)

19th Sep 2008, 10:42

Colleen says:

I have a bottle brush that is way too big...can I prune it drastically.? It is about 8 or 9 feet tall and Id like it to be about 5 or 6 ft. Can I prune it now (late winter)?

11th Feb 2009, 22:00

Jig along says:

Hi Colleen,

Being late summer in Australia, I would say that you are living in the top end of the world. Even so, I would think that pruning it to that size, at a time when its dormant, will be ok.

Usual pruning tips apply, cut at 90 degrees to reduce cut area.

Please note I'm not an expert in bottle brushes, just giving opinions on my experiences with bottle brushes, that have been growing in my backyard with plenty of neglect.

11th Feb 2009, 23:05

t.k says:

how can i propagate it from a cutting?the cutting that is to be taken from a mature 2m tree.
thanx a lot.

22nd Feb 2009, 12:54

Jig along says:

Hi TK

Bottle Brush propagate best using the tips of the plants. Make sure that you keep the cuttings moist and warm while its developing roots. Below is some steps on how to propagate using tips. Its an extract from the web

Tip cuttings
Detach a 2- to 6-inch piece of stem, including the terminal bud. Make the cut just below a node. Remove lower leaves that would touch or be below the medium. Dip the stem in rooting hormone if desired. Gently tap the end of the cutting to remove excess hormone. Make a hole in the medium with a pencil or pot label, and insert the cutting deeply enough into the media to support itself.

22nd Feb 2009, 13:14

Liza says:

I want to kow the time period of flowering that for how many months it keeps flowering kindly tell me if anyone read and know it?

31st Mar 2009, 07:36

Jig along says:

Hi Liza

What country are you living. In Australia, it flower around spring time for at least 3 and maybe 4 months.

31st Mar 2009, 09:46

raistlin(raistlin-at-internode-dot-on-dot-net) says:

I am in central Victoria, Australia, and have several bottlebrushes that have been in the ground for uo to 40 years and some only 12 months. have had a horrific summer here but they are all doing well. Secret is to tip prune after flowering which can be twice over 3 months and yes they do thrive on neglect but don't let them get straggly

12th Apr 2009, 00:56

Jig along says:

Hi Raistlin

Thanks for adding to the body of knowledge on Bottlebrushes.

12th Apr 2009, 02:59

PS says:

I am in Liverpool, and have a 6 foot high bottlebrush which got a bit straggly so I pruned it about 2 months ago - all the leaves seem to be drying up and curly - help, what can I do, as for the last few years it has been fantastic and full of bees and wasps.

10th May 2009, 20:19

PS says:

Me again - we had a very cold snap early on this year - would that affect the plant adversely?

10th May 2009, 20:22

Jig along says:

Hi PS

"All the leaves are drying up and curly". This doesn't sound at all good. Bottlebrush don't usually do this, unless something is seriously wrong.

I don't think that it was due to the pruning, unless the cuts made, provided an entry point for a disease of some type. I don't believe that the nursery would sell you a species of bottlebrush that wasn't tolerant to the weather conditions that could occur where you live.

At this stage, my only advice would be to not over water it, the plant shouldn't need fertiliser, but if you do use fertiliser, I have read that the NPK ratio should be around the 8:1:5. When all the leaves have dried up, check to see if the plant is still alive by scratching the bark with a knife. If it is not green then it maybe time for a replant.

Apologies for not having a magic fix. Hopefully someone else maybe able to provide some advice to assist.

10th May 2009, 23:44

Margaret(aikenaugie7-at-yahoo-dot-com) says:

Hi Everyone, I just got some cuttings from a bottlebrush plant in Mt. Pleasant, SC, USA. I am trying to root the cuttings and your info is extremely helpful. I did read somewhere on another site that you could plant the seeds. The stems that I have are full of little round nodules. Are these the seeds? Should I cut these off of the stems? Any info or help is greatly appreciated!

11th May 2009, 17:17

Jig along says:

Hi Margaret

I believe that those little round nodules are seed pods, that may contain seeds, depending on their maturity.

Any case, they should probably be removed, as you are trying to refocus the plants energies into growing roots when propagating from cuttings

11th May 2009, 22:46

Kaygee says:

Hi Jig along

Having recently seen some bottle brush bushes locally I thought that I might try propagating some from cuttings.

Using the Dogpile search engine (it's great, and supports The Dogs Ttrust - they never put a healthy dog down) I came across the link to this site which is brilliant, so the purpose of the message is simply to say thank you.

6th Jul 2009, 07:27

Jig along says:

Thanks kaygee. I've often wondered why so many people have visited this page, as it's buried pretty deep in the google searches.

6th Jul 2009, 08:40

Sylvia(sylvia_styring_hill-at-hotmail-dot-com) says:

Thanks for all the advice on your site, I've got an extremely vigorous bottlebrush in my back garden which is in full bloom and many friends have asked for cuttings. I shall take your advice and keep my fingers crossed!!!

6th Jul 2009, 14:28

Nicky says:

Great to hear so much bottle brush love! I have being wondering whether to prune mine to remove the bare stems left after flowering. Is that an ok thing to do? Thanks!

12th Aug 2009, 11:49

Jig along says:

Pruning after flowering is ok. Removing bare (dead wood?) is good to.

13th Aug 2009, 22:14

scott(scott-at-jonesswenson-dot-com) says:

I have bottle brushes (in Austin, TX, USA) that froze recently and have turned light brown. Should I cut them back? If so, how far back?
Many thanks!

21st Feb 2010, 19:56

Anonymous says:

I dont think that they will need cutting back.

Bottle Brushes grow in England, which I'm led to believe get cold every now and then. If they needed to prune every time it had a frost, the plants would be very small.

Anyway best way to check is about a month or two after the event, scrape the bark back a bit, to check that the plant or section of plant is still alive (don't ring bark the poor plant:)

21st Feb 2010, 22:31

Jules says:

I live in England my bottle brush is on a clay hill and is 6 foot high and 34 yrs old it flowers every year - just now its all brown is this OK? I dont remember it going brown before but we did have 3 ft of snow this winter!!! should I cut off the old flowers? there are 2 on each branch like hydrangers? what should I do

18th Apr 2010, 19:13

jules says:

my BB is all brown its 4 yr old 6ft high on a clay hill what should I do I am in the UK we did have 3ft of snow this year

18th Apr 2010, 19:15

Jig along says:

Hi Jules. I'm not an expert, but in my opinion, pruning the old flowers will not do further damage to the BB. Do not water it, do not fertilise the plant. The clay soils will hold enough water in the soil and they dont like wet feet. Also they dont like phosphorus in their feed.

18th Apr 2010, 23:46

blueorangebox(blueorangebox-at-hotmail-dot-co-dot-uk) says:

I just bought a small bottlebrush plant rom the clearance section, it was dry aned very pot bound. now its watered and panted against south facing fence it seems happier, but i have no idea how to look after it, any advice? i am in the midlands

3rd Jun 2010, 14:55

Anonymous says:

While taking cuttings of any Plants, try to take it a portion of an old branch along with the semi ripe branch. Strip the leaves off the cuttings as they dehydrate the cuttings( They eventually fall off anyway) Prune off the extra branches. Dip the cuttings in rooting hormones and do not force couttings directly into the soin. Use a stick to stake a hole first, then place your cuttings in the hole and firm the soil around it. Personally I use claey soil for hard wooded cuttings as it firmly fixes the cutting to the soil hence minimizes shaking of the cuttings which hampers rooting, however make sure there is good water drainage. Use plastic pots as it maintains soil humidity and temperature essential for development of new roots. Place the pots in a sheltered place. Place a small stone or a fairly sized pebble near the base of the cuttings, you can use these to water on nstead of directly pouring into the pot which micht expose the delicate new roots . Take cuttings when plants are dormant or semi dormant. Happy gardening :)

25th Jul 2013, 23:10

Aditya Kamikaze Rai says:

While taking cuttings of any Plants, try to take a portion of an old branch along with the semi ripe branch. Strip the leaves off the cuttings as they dehydrate the cuttings( They eventually fall off anyway) Prune off the extra branches. Dip the cuttings in rooting hormones and do not force cuttings directly into the soil. Instead Use a stick to stake a hole first, then place your cuttings gently into the hole and firm the soil around it. Personally I use claey soil for hard wooded cuttings as it firmly fixes the cutting to the soil hence minimizes shaking of the cuttings which hampers rooting, however make sure there is good water drainage. Use plastic pots as it maintains soil humidity and temperature essential for development of new roots. Place the pots in a sheltered place. Place a small stone or a fairly sized pebble near the base of the cuttings, you can use these to water on nstead of directly pouring into the pot which micht expose the delicate new roots . Take cuttings when plants are dormant or semi dormant. Happy gardening :)

25th Jul 2013, 23:11